New drugs for childhood cancers: could biotechs end the drought?

An article in Cancerworld magazine by journalist Sophie Fessl, summarizes well the issues Unite2Cure is raising.

 

The chances of surviving a childhood cancer have changed very little over the past two decades. Sophie Fessl talked to parents, doctors, regulators and researchers about what has to be done to address this disastrous impasse. “It feels odd to say this, but Elliot is one of the lucky ones.” The comment comes from Nicole Scobie (photo, above, with Elliot), and refers to her son, who was only four years old when he was diagnosed with a stage IV Wilm’s tumour. His left kidney was engulfed by a huge cancerous mass and his lungs were full of metastases. The heart-stopping diagnosis was just the start of a rollercoaster of emotions, hospital stays and exhaustion. But this is a story with hope: Elliot responded well to chemotherapy. He went into remission after 10 months of treatment, and has remained so for the past four years.

 

“At least for his cancer, there is a treatment that works,” says Nicole. Not all the children she and her son befriended during their long stay at the Lausanne University Hospital’s children’s cancer ward can consider themselves as ‘lucky’. Elliot became close friends with Zoe, a little girl battling an aggressive neuroblastoma. But while Elliot’s prospects looked good, for Zoe, the odds were stacked against her. In the end, there was nothing her medical team could do: Zoe died in her mother’s arms aged four.

The difference between Elliot and Zoe? Elliot had a type of cancer that has been successfully treated for decades, being one of the first childhood cancers – alongside acute lymphoblastic leukaemia – to benefit from the chemotherapies pioneered by Sydney Farber back in the 1950s. His is part of the celebrated success story that saw cancer survival rates among children increase from 10% to 80% over 50 years.

Zoe, by contrast, had a type of childhood cancer that remains fatal in the majority of cases. Her story is shared by 6,000 children and young people under 24 who are still dying of cancer each year in Europe. For parents like Nicole Scobie, who’ve seen their child’s life in the balance, that is a heartbreaking statistic. But there’s a worse one – the mortality rate from childhood cancers has barely changed over the past 16 years.

Last year, Scobie was one of a large group of parents and advocacy organisations that got together to found Unite2Cure, an advocacy organisation that aims to kickstart progress again.

Read the full article online here or download in PDF format here

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